Online Shops for Afrocurlitans

ATTENTION AFROCURLITANS: We wanted to share a list of online stores that ship hair products in your individual countries. Pleases keep in mind that this list will constantly be evolving and we would appreciate it if you would share some of your online stores with us!

GHANA

Kaymu Online Shop GhanaKAYMU

AFRO OBSESSIONAFRO OBSESSION

NIGERIA

Logo OloriOLORÌ (I’ve personally ordered products from Olori and I love them! They deliver straight to your door and their shipping is quick. I even pay for my order at my door through a POS.)

http://static.jumia.com.ng/cms/_dele/jumia_logo_NY5.gifJUMIA

NATURAL NIGERIAN

Bounty Brooks Ltd Sizzelle Online StoreSIZZELLE

CAMEROON/GABON/EQUATORIAL GUINEA

AVLON CAMEROON – HAIR PLUS

KENYA

JUMIA

Kaymu Online Shop KenyaKAYMU

SOUTH AFRICA

NICHE HAIR CARE

NATURAL MOISTURE

FAITHFUL TO NATURE

Tender Loving Hair

Salon Prep

Fabu_Salonpage

Source

I recently moved back to Lagos and I don’t have a hairdresser here. I’ve decided to go to what my cousin calls a “nice looking” salon close to my house tomorrow and I’m prepping for my first visit.

I thought I’d share a few tips that will ensure that you get the most out of your hair session:

1. BE ASSERTIVE, BE…EE ASSERTIVE!

If you are soft spoken, shy, too polite, especially with hair dressers in Nigeria, if you aren’t careful, you will be taken for a ride and may even end up on Creamy Crack Lane. Hairdressers here will try and take over your hair appointment. They will almost force you to use certain products because they are convenient or use techniques that you are certain will damage your hair or (my personal favorite) complain about how difficult your hair is and expound on the benefits of a relaxer.

The only way to combat these tactics is to BE ASSERTIVE. If you want a wash and blow out, let them know that from the beginning of the hair appointment. You may even have to keep saying it during the appointment, so they know you are being serious. If they start de-tangling your hair from the root to tip, speak up girl, or deal with the split ends. Even if you are afraid of sounding rude or obnoxious, just remember this, you have to deal with your hair after the salon session, not the woman who talked you into ruining your hair.

2. COME WITH YOUR INSTRUCTION MANUAL

When I say come with your instruction manual, I don’t mean type out a 15-page instruction booklet titled “How to Style (insert name)’s Hair”. I mean, you are the expert on your own hair, so teach the hair dresser what she doesn’t know. Many hair dresser’s here never went to cosmetology school and are only comfortable doing relaxed hair. If you ask many of them to “co-wash” your hair, the most you will get is a quizzical expression. So, be prepared to teach your hair dresser how you like to co-wash/wash your hair, style your hair, de-tangle your hair, flat iron your hair, etc.

I’ve learned from past experience that many hair dressers are receptive to learning how to style natural hair. Just remember to be patient, polite, and also ASSERTIVE!

3. BRING YOUR ARSENAL

Always bring the products and/or tools that you really love using to the salon with you. If you only wash your hair with a certain product, don’t expect a salon to carry it. Salon’s usually have a specific line of products they use for the general population in stock, if you don’t like those products, do yourself and your hair stylist a favor and bring your stash.

Here is a list of products and tools I normally carry with me when I want to get a blow out (please keep in mind that I’m anal about my hair care routine):

a. My favorite conditioner (Pantene Pro-V Naturals Co-Wash Conditioner)

b. a wide-tooth comb

c. a denman brush

d. My favorite heat protectant (Got 2b Guardian Angel Flat Iron Balm)

e. Castor Oil (to oil my scalp)

f. Apple Cider Vinegar (Yes, I bring my bottle of acv because I’ve yet to visit a salon that carries it.)

d. My blow dryer (I have a nice Ionic Blow Dryer and I get much better results with it than most hair dryers I’ve tried.)

4. “IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY, TRY, TRY AGAIN”

I’m sure William Edward Hickson wasn’t referring to a hair salon, when he first said this proverb, but I believe it applies. The first, second, or third hair salon’s may not be a hit for you, but if you prefer going to a salon to get your hair done, keep trying them out until you find a stylist you can trust.

LET US KNOW IF THESE TIPS HELP YOU AND FEEL FREE TO SHARE YOUR TIPS WITH US!

Wedding ‘Dos: TWA Edition

I’m not sure about the rest of Africa, but it seems like in West Africa, wedding season is a year round occurrence. For women with TWA’s who are attending or participating in these weddings, figuring out a cute hairstyle can be…overwhelming. I get the same complaint/question all the time, “I’m tired of wearing the same old afro I wear to work to a wedding, what can I do with my hair??”

Well ladies, there is no need to fret, because I found a few great tutorials on Youtube that should help (especially for those with Type 4 hair):

6 STYLES TO KEEP YOUR TRANSITIONING HAIR FIERCE

We’ve received quite a few questions about hairstyle suggestion for transitioning hair, this week, so we decided to answer via a blog post (surprise surprise).

In our last post, we discussed the “struggles” associated with managing the two textures and preventing breakage.  This, however, does not mean you can’t transition and make it look effortless.  The key is in choosing styles that require little manipulation.  Here are a few styles to help you manage your transitioning hair and still look fabulous.

1. ROLLER SET

roller setSource

                    roller set updoSource

 The following two links have a great method that I have used successfully: Best Ever Roller Set on 4c Natural Hair4c Natural Hair|Magnetic Roller Set Tutorial

After setting your hair, I’d recommend air drying because heat can be extremely damaging to transitioning hair, but if you want to use some heat then eliminate direct heat, such as the blow dryer, and opt for a hooded dryer set on low heat.

2. BRAID OUT

braid out

I tend to prefer braid outs over twist out for transitioning hair.  The twist out on the permed part can look a little flat sometimes.  Also, putting rollers or curl rods on the ends will enhance the curl.  You can leave it down as shown in the picture above, or style it into an updo.

3. BANTU KNOT OUT

Bantu-Knot-Out-Success-ZN

Bantu knot outs are easy, quick to do and can last for about 3 days or more without the need to touch up.  It also makes your hair look fuller. In fact it could actually be two styles: you can wear the bantu knots for a few days, then undo them and wear them in a twist out.

4. CORN ROW PROTECTIVE STYLE

corn row style                                                          Source

This style is fantastic.  You can just do it after washing and conditioning your hair, and it can last up to a week if you scarf your hair before going to sleep.

5. MOHAWK TWIST OUT

Mohawk Twist out                                                            Source

This style is a simple flat twist with the front untwisted.  You can also use rollers, curl or flexi rods for the loose hair in front.

6. FLEXI ROD SET

flexi rod set Source

Flexi rod sets are also a great way to get some volume and stretch out your hair.  You can wear it out or style it in an updo. Here’s a video to guide you through the process: Heatless Curls! | Flexi Rods | Transitioning Hair

We hope these styles go long way into helping you keep your hairstyles interesting so you don’t get frustrated with the transitioning process.